The African Centre for Biodiversity (ACB) welcomes you to our website. We are a research and advocacy organisation working towards food sovereignty and agro-ecology in Africa, with a focus on biosafety, seed systems and agricultural biodiversity. The organisation is committed to dismantling inequalities and resisting corporate-industrial expansion in Africa's food and agriculture systems.

Collage drawing of women farmers preparing food and sowing as well as a field and different vegetables.

IPC's letter on UN Food Systems Summit: Call for support

Alert

The International Planning Committee for Food Sovereignty (IPC) calls on CSOs to endorse their letter of concern to the UN regarding the 2021 World Food Summit

Since the 1996 Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nation's (FAO's) World Food Summit (WFS) in Rome, civil society organisations (CSOs) supporting food sovereignty have created alliances across movements and initiated dialogues with governments and institutions to influence shifts in policy.

This inclusive participatory process has involved, “thousands of representatives of small-scale food producers and Indigenous Peoples organisations in many crucial events and fora on agriculture and food systems all over the world, where their voices were previously absent.”

Insights from farmer dialogues in Kalulushi, Zambia

Blog

 In 2019, the African Centre for Biodiversity (ACB) co-hosted four farmer exchanges in Zambia. The first was in Kalulushi, Copperbelt Province, in partnership with the Zambia College of Horticultural Training (ZCHT) Chapula, Kasisi Agricultural Training Centre (KATC), and the Zambia Alliance for Agroecology and Biodiversity (ZAAB).

 ACB Advocacy and Research Officer Rutendo Zendah gives an account of what happened.

The GM potato push in Rwanda: With regulatory hurdles in Uganda, is this the industry’s fall back?

Press release

To enable the introduction of the first GM crop to be grown in Rwanda – a GM potato variety named ‘Victoria’ – the Rwandan government is fast-tracking the development of a biosafety policy and legal framework.
Civil society is deeply concerned about the potential risks of this GM potato variety, which has been genetically modified through cisgenesis – a process that involves taking three genes from three wild South American potato varieties to confer resistance to late blight.