Insights from farmer dialogues in Kalulushi, Zambia

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 In 2019, the African Centre for Biodiversity (ACB) co-hosted four farmer exchanges in Zambia. The first was in Kalulushi, Copperbelt Province, in partnership with the Zambia College of Horticultural Training (ZCHT) Chapula, Kasisi Agricultural Training Centre (KATC), and the Zambia Alliance for Agroecology and Biodiversity (ZAAB).

 ACB Advocacy and Research Officer Rutendo Zendah gives an account of what happened.

Agroecology as an alternative (Video four of a four-part series)

Video

In August 2018, the Rural Women’s Assembly (RWA) and the African Centre for Biodiversity (ACB) hosted a speak-out for SADC smallholder farmers in Windhoek, Namibia, on Farm Input Subsidy Programmes (FISPs).

FISPs are government agricultural programmes that promote Green Revolution inputs produced by multinational corporations, such as chemical fertilizers. In Ghana, for example, up to 47% of the agricultural budget is spent on fertilizer subsidies.

But the top-down FISP packages do not support holistic farming practices. To address this, in Ghana CSOs and farmers have come together to form an agroecology network. At regional level they are creating hubs for farmer-to-farmer training and at national level the network is mobilising for the FISP to be expanded to include support for agroecological farming methods.

Experiences of FISP: Farm Input Subsidy Programmes in Africa

Video

In August 2018, the Rural Women’s Assembly (RWA) and the African Centre for Biodiversity (ACB) hosted a speak-out for SADC smallholder farmers in Windhoek, Namibia, on Farm Input Subsidy Programmes (FISPs).

FISPs are government agricultural programmes that promote the use of Green Revolution inputs produced by multinational corporations. Farmers were not properly consulted about their introduction and felt powerless to refuse them. They were also led to believe that FISPs would make inputs cheaper and improve soil fertility.