Seed/Food Sovereignty
Alliance for Food Sovereignty in Africa (AFSA) submission to ARIPO, AU and UNECA for urgent intervention in draft ARIPO Plant Variety Protection Protocol, in order to protect farmers’ rights and the right to food. PDF Print option in slimbox / lytebox? (info) E-mail
Wednesday, 02 July 2014 13:37

This submission contains several grounds upon which AFSA is seeking urgent interventions by ARIPO, the AU and the UNECA to urgently revise the draft ARIPO PVP Protocol to protect farmers rights and the right to food.


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AFSA Makes Small Gains for Farmers’ Rights in Draft SADC PVP Protocol PDF Print option in slimbox / lytebox? (info) E-mail
Sunday, 22 June 2014 11:13

AFSA-BriefingAFSA members participated at a SADC Regional Workshop that took place 13-14 March 2014, in Johannesburg, South Africa. The aim of the workshop was to review the draft SADC PVP Protocol. After marathon, highly contentious and difficult discussions, AFSA members were able to persuade member states to amend key provisions in the draft SADC PVP Protocol dealing with “disclosure of origin” and “farmers’ rights”. While some space was opened through the participation of AFSA members at the very tail end of the workshop, the objections to the draft SADC PVP Protocol being based on UPOV 1991still remain. Indeed, the road ahead for smallholders and their seed systems continues to look extremely bleak. A radical shift is required at the political level away from a singular system that favours only one kind of plant breeding (industrial) and corporate seed systems that facilitate commercial growing and regional trade in improved and protected seed only and in which smallholders’ role is defined as that of passive consumers or growers in certification schemes (that produce improved/protected seed) to a system that embraces a multitude of actors and encourages a diversity of farming systems and seed.

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Download the PROTOCOL FOR PROTECTION OF NEW VARIETIES OF PLANTS (PLANT BREEDERS’ RIGHTS) IN THE SOUTHERN AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY REGION244.43 Kb

 
SLAVISHLY FOLLOWING UPOV 1991 PDF Print option in slimbox / lytebox? (info) E-mail
Monday, 16 June 2014 19:50

Mozambique-UPOV-1991In this report, the ACB provides a critique of the Mozambique PVP law and concludes that the government of Mozambique has turned a blind eye to its small-scale farmers and their seed and farming systems. The provisions dealing with the exclusive rights granted to plant breeders’ and the exceptions to those rights render the centuries-old African farmers’ practices of freely using, exchanging and selling seeds/propagating material illegal.

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Download the Mozambique PVP Law 115.08 Kb

 
AFSA’S COMMENTS ON ARIPO’s RESPONSES TO CIVIL SOCIETY: DRAFT LEGAL FRAMEWORK FOR PLANT VARIETY PROTECTION PDF Print option in slimbox / lytebox? (info) E-mail
Thursday, 20 March 2014 12:18

At the 2013 November meeting of the Administrative Council and Council of Ministers of ARIPO countries held in Kampala, Uganda, several documents on the proposed legal framework for Plant Variety Protection were distributed. Also circulated was a Matrix1 containing ARIPO’s responses to a detailed submission by civil society organizations (CSO) dated 6th November 20122. In this AFSA Comments, we respond to this Matrix, which is evasive, baseless and shows that ARIPO’s assertions that the views and comments of civil society have been taken into account is simply false.

 

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Giving With One Hand and Taking With Two: A Critique of Agra's African Agriculture Status Report 2013 PDF Print option in slimbox / lytebox? (info) E-mail
Monday, 18 November 2013 18:56
AGRA-report-cover

The African Centre for Biosafety (ACB) has released a comprehensive critique of a report published by the African Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA). The analysis of AGRA's African Agriculture Status Report 2013 reveals that AGRA’s vision is premised on Public Private Partnerships in which African governments will shoulder the cost and burden of developing regulatory procedures and infrastructure to enable private agribusiness to profit from new African markets.

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