Seed/Food Sovereignty
The political economy of Africa’s burgeoning chemical fertiliser rush PDF Print option in slimbox / lytebox? (info) E-mail
Monday, 15 September 2014 07:43

Fertilizer-report-20140915The African Centre for Biosafety has today released an in-depth report, The Political Economy of Africa’s burgeoning chemical fertiliser rush, which looks at the role of fertiliser in the Green Revolution push in Africa, some of the key present and future fertiliser trends on the continent and the major players involved in this.

The value of the global fertiliser industry is immense. In 2012 the global sales of NPK fertilisers alone were over US$200 billion, compared to a total global pesticide market of US$75 billion. Though Africa accounts for only around 1.6% of global consumption, discoveries of huge deposits of natural gas around the continent (a key fertiliser ingredient) is expected to result in a flurry of fertiliser plant construction, the costs of which are likely to run in the billions of dollars.

In parallel developments, the promotion of fertiliser use in Africa is a core component of the new Green Revolution push on the continent. This is most clearly articulated by the Abuja Declaration of 2006, which called for average fertiliser use across the continent to increase for 8kg per ha to 50kg per ha by 2015. In the interim, numerous initiatives have place increasing fertiliser use (particularly by small-holder farmers) at the centre of their activities, including the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA), Grow Africa and the G8 New Alliance on Food Security and Nutrition. The global fertilise industry, directly through the Norwegian giant Yara, and indirectly through industry bodies such as the International Fertiliser Development Centre, are heavily involved in these processes.

Download the full report 1.69 Mb

 
Africa an El Dorado for South Africa’s Agribusiness Giants PDF Print option in slimbox / lytebox? (info) E-mail
Tuesday, 02 September 2014 09:25

SA-Agribus-coverSouth African agribusinesses are aggressively expanding into Africa in search of profits from a relatively untapped consumer market with rising income levels and to escape the country’s negative economic conditions. This paper traces this expansion and outlines the implications for Africa’s market structure, food security and food sovereignty movements, as well as exploring the potential impact on Africa’s small-scale farmers and producers.

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Alliance for Food Sovereignty in Africa (AFSA) submission to ARIPO, AU and UNECA for urgent intervention in draft ARIPO Plant Variety Protection Protocol, in order to protect farmers’ rights and the right to food. PDF Print option in slimbox / lytebox? (info) E-mail
Wednesday, 02 July 2014 13:37

This submission contains several grounds upon which AFSA is seeking urgent interventions by ARIPO, the AU and the UNECA to urgently revise the draft ARIPO PVP Protocol to protect farmers rights and the right to food.


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AFSA Makes Small Gains for Farmers’ Rights in Draft SADC PVP Protocol PDF Print option in slimbox / lytebox? (info) E-mail
Sunday, 22 June 2014 11:13

AFSA-BriefingAFSA members participated at a SADC Regional Workshop that took place 13-14 March 2014, in Johannesburg, South Africa. The aim of the workshop was to review the draft SADC PVP Protocol. After marathon, highly contentious and difficult discussions, AFSA members were able to persuade member states to amend key provisions in the draft SADC PVP Protocol dealing with “disclosure of origin” and “farmers’ rights”. While some space was opened through the participation of AFSA members at the very tail end of the workshop, the objections to the draft SADC PVP Protocol being based on UPOV 1991still remain. Indeed, the road ahead for smallholders and their seed systems continues to look extremely bleak. A radical shift is required at the political level away from a singular system that favours only one kind of plant breeding (industrial) and corporate seed systems that facilitate commercial growing and regional trade in improved and protected seed only and in which smallholders’ role is defined as that of passive consumers or growers in certification schemes (that produce improved/protected seed) to a system that embraces a multitude of actors and encourages a diversity of farming systems and seed.

Download the briefing 171.22 Kb

 

Download the PROTOCOL FOR PROTECTION OF NEW VARIETIES OF PLANTS (PLANT BREEDERS’ RIGHTS) IN THE SOUTHERN AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY REGION244.43 Kb

 
SLAVISHLY FOLLOWING UPOV 1991 PDF Print option in slimbox / lytebox? (info) E-mail
Monday, 16 June 2014 19:50

Mozambique-UPOV-1991In this report, the ACB provides a critique of the Mozambique PVP law and concludes that the government of Mozambique has turned a blind eye to its small-scale farmers and their seed and farming systems. The provisions dealing with the exclusive rights granted to plant breeders’ and the exceptions to those rights render the centuries-old African farmers’ practices of freely using, exchanging and selling seeds/propagating material illegal.

Download the ACBio comments 1.26 Mb

Download the Mozambique PVP Law 115.08 Kb

 
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